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70's Discuss all your favorite classic rock & pop from the 70's.

View Poll Results: Was Jim Morrison burned out after "L.A. Woman"?
Yes. 18 36.73%
No. He and the rest of the Doors could have continued to record excellent albums. 31 63.27%
Voters: 49. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-11-2008, 12:31 PM   #73
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Exclamation Re: Was Jim Morrison burned out at the time of his death?

Deja Vu:

Didn't Mr. Spock call suicide "The Final Frontier"? Now Spock's advice should always be taken seriously.

Btw ~ 36 is a good number. It worked for Marilyn.
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Old 08-11-2008, 06:21 PM   #74
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Re: Was Jim Morrison burned out at the time of his death?

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Originally Posted by Deja Vu View Post
I'm gonna do the sensible thing and only live for 30some years. That way my body, mind, and money only have to last that long, and I can be certain to have lived a full life with very little pain in it. That's called choosing quality over quantity.
I wonder if you'll still feel the same way when you get there though. Also, a lot of people's most quality years come later in life. Life to 30 is the biggest struggle for a lot of folks.
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Old 08-11-2008, 06:51 PM   #75
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Re: Was Jim Morrison burned out at the time of his death?

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Originally Posted by troggy View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deja Vu View Post
I'm gonna do the sensible thing and only live for 30some years. That way my body, mind, and money only have to last that long, and I can be certain to have lived a full life with very little pain in it. That's called choosing quality over quantity.
I wonder if you'll still feel the same way when you get there though. Also, a lot of people's most quality years come later in life. Life to 30 is the biggest struggle for a lot of folks.
Believe what you want, friend, but these are my beliefs. They're my ideas about the world and they haven't changed at all in the last few years despite the fact that I lived 4 entirely different lifestyles this last year alone. Some people lose or gain religion later in life, but you can pretty much count me as a lifer, a dedicated priest (as far as my devotion goes). Again, the "struggle" isn't my issue. My life is easy. But I don't find the idea of a long life appealing. To me, quality over quantity means not having to waste today so you can live a hypothetical better tomorrow. That doesn't sound like the right choice to me. Could I change my mind? It's possible. And Jim Carrey might decide that he wasted his life being a comedy star, or Roger Waters might become convinced that he should have been a sales clerk. I just make the best possible decisions based on all of the information I have at the time, I daresay that's all we can do.
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Old 08-12-2008, 09:59 AM   #76
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Exclamation Re: Was Jim Morrison burned out at the time of his death?

Deja Vu:

Quote:
I'm gonna do the sensible thing and only live for 30some years. That way my body, mind, and money only have to last that long, and I can be certain to have lived a full life with very little pain in it. That's called choosing quality over quantity.

.... I don't find the idea of a long life appealing.
1. There is no way a man has to be washed up by his thirties. With only mild exercise, you can be an absolute brute physically relative to what you were in your teens. And unless you've fried your brain cells with drugs or alcohol, your mind's problem solving capabilities improve with experience.

2. Ambition is a wonderful thing. Develop some of that and enough abiding interests and there's no way you'll want to leave things behind - at any age let alone your thirties. You've clearly not reached the stage where you find enough fascinating things in this world. An intelligent man does, sooner rather than later.

3. Getting laid will no longer be the issue for you in your thirties as it might be now.

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Old 08-12-2008, 11:24 AM   #77
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Re: Was Jim Morrison burned out at the time of his death?

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Originally Posted by Deja Vu View Post
Believe what you want, friend, but these are my beliefs.
Yes, I understand that. All I'm saying is that people's beliefs and perspectives sometimes change over time. I'm not saying that yours will but it's certainly possible.

Quote:
They're my ideas about the world and they haven't changed at all in the last few years despite the fact that I lived 4 entirely different lifestyles this last year alone.
Okay, but the mere fact that you've lived four lifestyles in one year indicates that you are constantly changing, in fact more quickly than most.

Quote:
To me, quality over quantity means not having to waste today so you can live a hypothetical better tomorrow. That doesn't sound like the right choice to me.
Yes but why wouldn't you be able to live a quality life after age 30? Why would you have to "waste today" at that age? I maintain that it could all be quality, if that's what you want.

Quote:
Could I change my mind? It's possible. I just make the best possible decisions based on all of the information I have at the time, I daresay that's all we can do.
Yep, which is exactly why your perspective may change by the time you reach 30. Again, I'm not saying that it will or even that it should. But it's certainly a possibility.
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Old 08-12-2008, 01:49 PM   #78
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Smile Re: Was Jim Morrison burned out at the time of his death?

Deja Vu:

I agree with Troggy on all points.

Life can/does change in a blink of an eye, the key is to be flexible.

Good-Luck ...
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Old 08-12-2008, 05:05 PM   #79
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Re: Was Jim Morrison burned out at the time of his death?

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Originally Posted by Foxhound View Post
Deja Vu:

Quote:
I'm gonna do the sensible thing and only live for 30some years. That way my body, mind, and money only have to last that long, and I can be certain to have lived a full life with very little pain in it. That's called choosing quality over quantity.

.... I don't find the idea of a long life appealing.
1. There is no way a man has to be washed up by his thirties. With only mild exercise, you can be an absolute brute physically relative to what you were in your teens. And unless you've fried your brain cells with drugs or alcohol, your mind's problem solving capabilities improve with experience.

2. Ambition is a wonderful thing. Develop some of that and enough abiding interests and there's no way you'll want to leave things behind - at any age let alone your thirties. You've clearly not reached the stage where you find enough fascinating things in this world. An intelligent man does, sooner rather than later.

3. Getting laid will no longer be the issue for you in your thirties as it might be now.

Thanks for trying, but I daresay you have no idea what my world is like. You just want me to percieve the world like you do. I'm not some heady kid who wants to be unique. When I was 13 I realized I was just an average kid, and since then I assumed that all my experiences were normal. Alas, every turn I make people keep telling me "that's not what normal people experience at all." If normal people prefer a life of pain over a death with none, so be it. But that's not me.

(2) To suggest that all I need is some hobbies to make me want to stay would be laughable to anyone who has any idea what I dedicate my time to... Hobbies. Things I love, things I adore, things that intrigue me. I try new things every day and so far there's nothing I know of on the planet Earth that I would stay alive for. I've had incredible, mind-blowing loves, for people and for soul-stirring media like music and for activities like walking. The very best of them were, at best, a fabulous detour. None of them made me want to live a long life, that's simply not something I have any desire to do. Surely you can understand. Surely you don't think no one alive has ever had a legitimate preference for a short life. (1) If I have lived a good life, I should barely be able to function at 30. I will never watch what I eat, I will never avoid dangerous terrains, and I will never hold back on my drug intake, and this what a good life is. I'm experiencing the world unabridged, to limit myself would ruin the fun. Death is the end of pain forever. The dead have exactly zero capacity to feel remorse or sadness over what they supposedly lost. If we were smart, everyone would kill themselves right now. (3) Getting laid has lost its sway for me. Death is far more important to me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by METALPRIEST View Post
No. Everybody can do and has more.
Do you mean to say that there's something that people can do other than take everything into consideration and make the best decision possible based on what they know and understand? Because I would have to disagree and ask you what else one can do.

Quote:
Originally Posted by troggy View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deja Vu View Post
Believe what you want, friend, but these are my beliefs.
Yes, I understand that. All I'm saying is that people's beliefs and perspectives sometimes change over time. I'm not saying that yours will but it's certainly possible.

Quote:
They're my ideas about the world and they haven't changed at all in the last few years despite the fact that I lived 4 entirely different lifestyles this last year alone.
Okay, but the mere fact that you've lived four lifestyles in one year indicates that you are constantly changing, in fact more quickly than most.

Quote:
To me, quality over quantity means not having to waste today so you can live a hypothetical better tomorrow. That doesn't sound like the right choice to me.
Yes but why wouldn't you be able to live a quality life after age 30? Why would you have to "waste today" at that age? I maintain that it could all be quality, if that's what you want.

Quote:
Could I change my mind? It's possible. I just make the best possible decisions based on all of the information I have at the time, I daresay that's all we can do.
Yep, which is exactly why your perspective may change by the time you reach 30. Again, I'm not saying that it will or even that it should. But it's certainly a possibility.
Yes, I agreed with you, it's possible. But whatever happens, I won't regret what I'm doing now, just as I don't regret what I did in elementary school even though I'd probably do it differently if the current me went back there. I only do the best I can.

It's possible that it could all be quality for me, but this seems virtually impossible to me because the best things in life are considered self-destructive. But even if I end up being the new Keith Richards, I'm still weary of choosing to live long because I think death is a wonderful thing.

Also, the 4 different lives I lived was a result of following other people's ideas of what is right instead of my own. Now that I have quit that, my lifestyle might not change again for the rest of my life.

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Old 08-13-2008, 10:21 AM   #80
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Exclamation Re: Was Jim Morrison burned out at the time of his death?

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Also, the 4 different lives I lived was a result of following other people's ideas of what is right instead of my own.
May I suggest beatnik and then mod? You've not lived life to the fullest until you've tried those. Sugar pimp is a real good style as well but it's a tough one to pull off for a white man. I've never been able to really get it down myself:

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Old 08-13-2008, 12:00 PM   #81
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Re: Was Jim Morrison burned out at the time of his death?

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Old 08-13-2008, 12:32 PM   #82
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Exclamation Re: Was Jim Morrison burned out at the time of his death?

Two things.

1. You've got to learn not to take either yourself or life as a whole so seriously.

2. Beatniks, mods and sugar pimp daddies are all very cool. You seem to be willing to experiment with things so keep an open mind to these as lifestyle statements. They're very strong, each in its own way.





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Old 08-13-2008, 01:06 PM   #83
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Re: Was Jim Morrison burned out at the time of his death?

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Two things.

1. You've got to learn not to take either yourself or life as a whole so seriously.

2. Beatniks, mods and sugar pimp daddies are all very cool. You seem to be willing to experiment with things so keep an open mind to these as lifestyle statements. They're very strong, each in its own way.





Meh, why should I do what you tell me to do? Nope, I don't take pre-packaged lifestyle statments. Doesn't appeal to me.
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Old 08-13-2008, 02:40 PM   #84
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Re: Was Jim Morrison burned out at the time of his death?

Yeah Foxhound, sounds like you should have hit him up earlier in the year.
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Old 08-13-2008, 03:25 PM   #85
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Re: Was Jim Morrison burned out at the time of his death?

Different lifestyles had nothing to do with clothing or what scene I was hanging out with or fluff like that. And none of them were intentional. I'm talking about the environment I lived in, the resources that were available to me. Being a hermit in a hermitage versus being surrounded by people 24/7 in a social paradise versus being a townie mooch versus being a pepetual working man. 4 entirely different lifestyles in 4 deeply conflicting environments. I'm not talking about sugar daddies.

Squares of such little faith. Just because I have different opinions you feel the need to mock. It's sad.
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Old 08-13-2008, 03:59 PM   #86
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Re: Was Jim Morrison burned out at the time of his death?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Deja Vu View Post
Different lifestyles had nothing to do with clothing or what scene I was hanging out with or fluff like that. And none of them were intentional. I'm talking about the environment I lived in, the resources that were available to me. Being a hermit in a hermitage versus being surrounded by people 24/7 in a social paradise versus being a townie mooch versus being a pepetual working man. 4 entirely different lifestyles in 4 deeply conflicting environments. I'm not talking about sugar daddies.

Squares of such little faith. Just because I have different opinions you feel the need to mock. It's sad.
Nah, not mocking, just cracking a joke.
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Old 08-15-2008, 05:47 AM   #87
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Re: Was Jim Morrison burned out at the time of his death?

Friends, could you tell me, how long Morrison had addiction - if he had?
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Old 08-15-2008, 09:56 AM   #88
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Re: Was Jim Morrison burned out at the time of his death?

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It's very difficult to be a drunkard and an addict, when you have to sing in public every day. We have never seen an office worker or, for instance, driver, who use cocain and drink a bottle of whiskey every day and make a career.

You can drink a six pack everyday however. I've done it.
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Old 08-15-2008, 09:56 AM   #89
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Exclamation Re: Was Jim Morrison burned out at the time of his death?

Moera:

Click on this link .... https://en.allexperts.com/q/Doors-Jim...-addiction.htm


They talk about a book called ~

Living in the Dead Zone Janis Joplin and Jim Morrison Understanding Borderline Personality Disorder.

Perhaps it might answer some of your questions on Jim Morrison.


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Old 08-15-2008, 09:59 AM   #90
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Re: Was Jim Morrison burned out at the time of his death?

Yes, I devote much of my time "turning people off." I find that they save more energy that way, and with the times the way they are.... it can be important to save energy.

I ain't got no significant pain in my life. Ain't lookin' for suicide to save me from anything or to win attention. I just think it's the most logical choice. If other people want to roll the dice and try to stretch their resources indefinitely, I've got nothing against that. But, me? I'm gonna do the sensible thing and only live for 30some years. That way my body, mind, and money only have to last that long, and I can be certain to have lived a full life with very little pain in it. That's called choosing quality over quantity.

And like Phil Anselmo for Dimebag, you're not invited to my funeral. It's gonna be an LSD-fueled orgy, so you're going to be missing out on quite a lot of fun. Too bad Dimebag's wasn't like that, but Phil should have been allowed to go anyway.



This is mortifying! Please reconsider!
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